It is always these idiots with massive Data::Dumper struts ….

*laugh*

Just found this in the source for PPI:

175 if ( $self->{source_bytes} > 1048576 ) {
176 # Dammit! It’s ALWAYS the “Perl” modules larger than a
177 # meg that seems to blow up the Tokenizer/Lexer.
178 # Nobody actually writes real programs larger than a meg
179 # Perl::Tidy (the largest) is only 800k.
180 # It is always these idiots with massive Data::Dumper
181 # structs or huge RecDescent parser.
182 PPI::Exception::ParserRejection->throw(“File is too large”);

PPI/Tokenizer.pm

Yeah. It’s your fault! :-)

Not actually sure why trying to use Test::Perl::Critic::Progressive results in this since I don’t have any files that are that big, but it made me laugh when I discovered the source of the message.

Advertisements

Please Stop Including the Kitchen Sink

I needed to install Business::OnlinePayment::WorldPay @ $work today. I had been using the module in my own perlbrew name space so as to not pollute the server with unnecessary modules, but as the code went live I needed to install it server side.

Little did I know that it triggers once of those dependency cascades that includes the kitchen sink.

Read more of this post

What does that module do? Task::Kensho.pm

Whenever I look at CPAN I am always amazed at the number of Perl modules that are available. Over 101,000 as of today. It just blows me away that that much time and effort has been put into coding these modules, by all of those people, and for free.

But at the same time I can’t help but think how can anyone possibly find the time to know what they all do? How do you find out what modules are relevant or helpful for your daily programming? More over when you are installing a module and it pulls in other modules don’t you want to know why? Perhaps some of those other modules could be useful to you too.

Read more of this post